Getting to know ourselves

When I hear “team building,” I cringe and think of trust falls. As a klutz with a fear of falling, I was relieved that we took a different approach at C2 Strategic Communications.

IMG_0649Led by Human Momentum, our entire team took the Strengths Finder test to discover our individual top five strengths out of 34 used by the Gallup Organization. Those strengths were separated into four key areas: executing, influencing, relationship building and strategic thinking.

We discovered our collective team has a lot of strength in strategic thinking – which is good, given our company name. Good-natured armchair psychoanalysis ensued as team members compared results. We found ourselves recognizing and referring to one another’s strengths in our conversations about projects and assignments. Because I’m strong in executing, I jokingly refer to myself as “The Executioner.” Another colleague with “Woo,” the strength of influencing, has set aside Tuesdays for business development, calling them “Woosdays.”

When I reflect on the guided discussion that followed the tests, the value of internal communication stands out. In a few hours, we learned what kinds of work individual team members prefer, or how other members manage projects or delegate tasks. I began to understand better my teammates’ work styles and skills.

Throughout our session with Human Momentum, I noticed Chad Carlton, our president, scribbling notes. Undoubtedly, we’ll use this self-assessment in structuring teams for our clients. After all, knowing yourself better can help you succeed. But knowing your team better can help your clients succeed.

Lisa Jessie,

C2 Business Strategist

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